1 Motivation: “Playing the Black Card” video





“Playing the black card” – a new video by Prager University goes far beyond ideological lines or or diversity of political views. Its content is downright racist aimed at the disparagement of blacks and their hardship.

The video comes with a quiz, study guide, facts and sources. It was released only hours ago and it has almost 100k views. PragerU YouTube channel has more than 1.400.000 million subscribers. And if you scroll down to comments, it gives a platform for racist and sexist comments.

Like anyone else, today I had other scholarly things to do - in my case, delivering a report on measurement invariance of Disgust instruments to fellow collaborators - but YouTube’s list of “recommended” videos displayed PragerU’s “Playing the Black card” video. The emotions ensuing from watching its propaganda drove me to stop my work and try to understand how the politico-psychological factors underlying attitudes towards black in the 2016 Election.

2 Analysis





Thankfully, I have been blessed with a nationally representative of the American population (N=1500) and a confirmatory convenience large sample (N=2119). These data were collected during the American general election in 2016. We hired a professional survey firm (SSI, a US-based market research institute that recruits participants from a panel of 7,139,027 American citizens; more information can be found at www.surveysampling.com). These data are unique in the sense they have many interesting political attitudes as well as psychological variables.

3 Summary of Results





When it comes to supporting the 1960’s Civil Rights Movement, there were important differences with respect to gender, age, race, area and religious affiliation. Women were much more supportive, as were the young and middle-aged, minority groups such as blacks and latinos, those self-identified as having no religion or being atheists/agnostics. In contrast, men, older and the elderly, whites, christians tended to support the Civil Rights movement less. There was also a divide in terms of living in rural vs. urban areas. Surprisingly, education seem to play no role. Along these lines, income and occupation show a diminute explanatory power, which only appears in contrasting groups at opposing sides. For occupation, there a marked disparity between retired vs. students (which likely be accounted by age). For income the very rich ($150,000+) tend to support the Civil Rights movements less than the average American, while those making from 15,000 to 24,999 tend to support more.

[Include Political Behaviour results]

But the most interesting questions are not concerned with the demographics or the partisanship or ideology of those holding these these beliefs, but rather with such questions as why people feel the way that they did or what is the implications of these beliefs are. Enter political psychology.

[Include correlates and Political Psychology results]





4 Support for 1960’s Civil Rights Movement

4.1 Demographics of Support for 1960’s Civil Rights Movement

We asked participants how positive or negative do you feel concerning the 1960’s Civil Rights Movement. Participants responded to this question in a 9-point scale ranging from extremely negative (1) to extremely positive (9).

4.1.1 Social Class





Figure X. Support for 1960's Civil Rights Movement as grouped by SES

Figure X. Support for 1960’s Civil Rights Movement as grouped by SES





Support for 1960’s Civil Rights Movement as grouped by SES
SES N Mean SD
Poor 38 -0.20 1.22
Rich 90 -0.08 0.91
Upper Middle Class 395 -0.05 0.99
Middle Middle Class 679 0.00 1.00
Lower Middle Class 298 0.11 1.01

4.1.2 Gender





Figure X. Support for 1960's Civil Rights Movement as grouped by Gender

Figure X. Support for 1960’s Civil Rights Movement as grouped by Gender





Support for 1960’s Civil Rights Movement as grouped by Gender
Gender N Mean SD
Male 740 -0.15 1.03
Female 760 0.14 0.95

4.1.3 Age





Figure X. Support for 1960's Civil Rights Movement as grouped by Age

Figure X. Support for 1960’s Civil Rights Movement as grouped by Age





Support for 1960’s Civil Rights Movement as grouped by Age
Age N Mean SD
65+ 254 -0.23 1.05
45-54 years 292 -0.12 1.01
55-64 years 234 -0.07 0.99
35-44 years 263 0.08 0.99
25-34 years 264 0.18 0.92
18-24 years 193 0.22 0.95

4.1.4 Education





Figure X. Support for 1960's Civil Rights Movement as grouped by Education

Figure X. Support for 1960’s Civil Rights Movement as grouped by Education





Support for 1960’s Civil Rights Movement as grouped by Education
Education N Mean SD
Graduate 193 -0.04 0.96
Some college 471 -0.03 1.05
Bachelor 310 0.02 0.95
Less than High-school 51 0.02 1.08
High-school 475 0.03 0.99

4.1.5 Income Levels





Figure X. Support for 1960's Civil Rights Movement as grouped by Income Levels

Figure X. Support for 1960’s Civil Rights Movement as grouped by Income Levels





Support for 1960’s Civil Rights Movement as grouped by Income Levels
Income Levels N Mean SD
$150,000 + 95 -0.23 0.95
$100,000-$149,999 160 -0.08 1.03
$75,000-$99,999 192 -0.06 0.99
$25,000-$34,999 176 -0.02 0.99
$35,000-$49,999 227 0.00 1.05
Less than $15,000 178 0.00 1.06
$50,000-$74,999 292 0.05 0.91
$15,000-$24,999 180 0.20 1.01

4.1.6 Ethnicity





Figure X. Support for 1960's Civil Rights Movement as grouped by Ethnicity

Figure X. Support for 1960’s Civil Rights Movement as grouped by Ethnicity





Support for 1960’s Civil Rights Movement as grouped by Ethnicity
Ethnicity N Mean SD
Native American 13 -0.16 1.27
Caucasian/European origin 1237 -0.06 1.01
Asian/Pacific Islander 29 0.04 0.89
Latino 88 0.21 0.86
Other 18 0.23 0.84
Black/African America 115 0.47 0.84

4.1.7 Occupation





Figure X. Support for 1960's Civil Rights Movement as grouped by Occupation

Figure X. Support for 1960’s Civil Rights Movement as grouped by Occupation





Support for 1960’s Civil Rights Movement as grouped by Occupation
Occupation N Mean SD
Retired 268 -0.13 1.03
Disabled 98 -0.06 1.08
Full-time caregiver 31 -0.05 1.17
Employed 768 -0.01 0.98
Parent 104 0.06 1.00
Student 85 0.15 0.98
Unemployed 146 0.23 0.94

4.1.8 Area





Figure X. Support for 1960's Civil Rights Movement as grouped by Area

Figure X. Support for 1960’s Civil Rights Movement as grouped by Area





Support for 1960’s Civil Rights Movement as grouped by Area
Area N Mean SD
Rural 545 -0.18 1.03
Urban 955 0.10 0.97





4.1.9 Religious Affiliation





Figure X. Support for 1960's Civil Rights Movement as grouped by Religious Affiliation

Figure X. Support for 1960’s Civil Rights Movement as grouped by Religious Affiliation





Support for 1960’s Civil Rights Movement as grouped by Religious Affiliation
Religious Affiliation N Mean SD
Christian 1014 -0.09 1.01
Muslim 9 0.05 0.91
Jewish 52 0.11 0.89
No religion 195 0.13 0.98
Atheist/Agnostic 230 0.25 0.96










5 Political Behavior and Support for 1960’s Civil Rights Movement

5.1 Political Orientation

Figure X. Support for 1960's Civil Rights Movement & Political Orientation

Figure X. Support for 1960’s Civil Rights Movement & Political Orientation